We can approach architecture for other implementers

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For a large majority of consulting companies both design and implement for ALL projects.  Though profitable for many firms, the best design can end up biased towards the agenda of the implementer which may be to sell more components, get more bodies. Now, we have the capability to implement architecture, but our end goal is not to design an architecture that is for us to implement, but an architecture that is implementable. 

Many times, the client knows that the implementer will design with a bias, so the client chooses to or must design blind without considering the maturity of what an implementer can provide. In those cases, we can come in, architect, and be a third party to help do the concept, design, and design the requirements and performance work statement basis.

This approach with these services buy-back risk to your implementation and increase the likelihood of achieving your metrics and goals.

  • In Architecture, We can design and not implement. Though all our designers come with deep experience in implementing, and we can, in cases as independent designers, we can provide the best design recommendations without bias for implementation.
  • In Management Consulting, we can stand-up program management, execute a program management or governance support in lieu of existing support, or transition to existing support. 
  • In FedBiz, we train, support, and consult implementers on federal business management, so they can focus on delivering a solid implementation. Quality contractor support to implement a design, project, or program is hard to find. Compliant, Responsive, Reliable is even harder in Government space
  • In Communications, we help promote the transformation effort
  • In Research, we continually re-invest in new models, patterns, and constructs that go back into our designs.

 Why do we do it? We are all stuck if there are not good implementers or integrators to implement the designs, so it is more important for us to see the transformation designs move forward.

Whiteboarding Data.gov and Geoplatform Original Vision

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Matt Tricomi

During the same week Xentity Team members presented on the data.gov and geoplatform integration vision at the International Data Conference, we had the opportunity to hold an information sharing exercise and whiteboard sessions with FGDC and data.gov executive sponsors to capture What does geodata.gov mean to data.gov.

In this session, we covered various user stories on the haves and have nots for the current data suppliers and what our analysis is suggesting data users want and how they want to access the data. Finally, we had discussions on how data.gov, geoplatform.gov can work with agencies to get these services funded and how geoplatform could serve the community.

The following captures a series of potential services that agencies may be requesting on geoplatform.gov as it unfolds. As the concept of geoplatform is for agencies to build out services as it sees fit and geoplatform.gov is more of the conveyance, governance, and service provider, how the actual services unfold could go anywhere.

 

 

What does geodata.gov mean to data.gov

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During the First International Open Government Data Conference in November 2010, Xentity Geospatial Services and Architect Lead, Jim Barrett had the opportunity to present alongside colleagues such as the OMB Federal CIO, CTO, Sir Tim Berners-Lee and several other name-dropping figures in this space.

Jim, at the time part of the XPN as independent consultant, presented on our recent conceptual architecture work for data.gov that looked to integrate the previous administrations geodata.gov. Geodata.gov open data registration accounts for over 80% of all data in data.gov, so its by all means a major impact to where data.gov would need to focus.

The conference appears to continue as a bi-annual event with the last one being held in July 2012

The following captures the extended version of his presentation:

Xentity supporting scanning maps

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Xentity won multi-year work to support creating high-quality scanned maps. See the handout on this program.

The USGS Historical Quadrangle Scanning Project (HQSP) is scanning all scales and all editions of approximately 200,000 topographic maps published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) since the inception of the topographic mapping program in 1884. This scanning will provide a comprehensive digital repository of USGS topographic maps, available to the public at no cost. This project serves the dual purpose of creating a master catalog and digital archive copies of the irreplaceable collection of topographic maps in the USGS Reston Map Library as well as making the maps available for viewing and downloading from the USGS Store and The National Map Viewer.

Staff from Xentity supported the arduous process for scanning and cataloging. The Madison, WI based staff over a couple calendar years were able to complete these very high-resolution scans. The process required an eye for detail and to not be complacent with simply getting the job done. The tasks included:

  • converting printed scientific reports and maps to an electronic format
  • create geo-databases for containing the scientific reports, maps, and satellite imagery
  • scan multiple scales and editions of the more than 75,000 reports published by the USGS since 1879.
  • accurately referencing the Geographic Names Information System and Topographic map metadata and data dictionaries for project completeness
  • Creating, managing, and running the metadata QA/QC process and metadata verification processing.
  • Maintaining end user documentation
  • Creating batch scripts for post-processing of image files.
  • manipulating the resulting scans in multiple GIS formats
  • Maintaining databases and front-end catalog systems

 

Denver-Metro Based Government Agencies and Functions

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Our blog on Blending a Distributed Transformation Team points out:

It is no secret that Politicians and Senior Executives in the Federal Government are Washington DC based. In the corporate world, they are Headquarter-based. They lead new policies, budget decisions, funding distribution and forming core principles and program direction for defense and civilian programs. 

But, its not very well known that a very large amount of those same programs are actually run out of Colorado. Colorado has over 53,000 Federal Government employees (Denver Post June 2011), not including federal contractors. The concentration of Federal Labs, Military Bases, Land and Science Program management, and multiple Science and operations centers are the main culprits. Specifically, for the civilian programs, Denver, has over 10,000 Federal Employees and contractors running the operations, hosting, and mission functions for those programs are in and around the Denver Federal Center. A majority of these agencies are Earth or Land Program focused. See a list of over 100 Agencies and functions.. In the commercial world, Denver also has a large presence in Communications, Satellites, Financial, and Restaurant Headquarters given its central U.S. location.

The paragraph references “See a list of over 100 Agencies and functions.” – here is that list

Government Service Agencies – Land and Earth Focused

Denver Federal Center (26 Agencies)

  • Department of the Interior (DOI)
    • Bureau of Land Management (BLM) – National Operations Center, Multiple System Engineering and Management Programs
    • U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) – National Water Quality Lab, Water Resources Research and Programs, Geospatial Operations, Earth Science and Analytics, Energy Resources, National Training Center, National Ice Core Lab, Core Research Center, Biological Resources, Geology Research Labs, Geologic Mapping, Library, Minerals and Availability, Global Change and Climate
    • Office of Surface Mining & Reclamation (OSM)
    • Bureau of Reclamation (BOR) – Technical Service Center, Civil Engineering, Water and Environmental Resrouces, Geotechnical, infrastructure services
    • Interior Business Center (IBC, formerly NBC) – Hosting Center, financial and business management systems
    • Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement (BOEMRE) – Mineral Revenue Management
  • U.S. Department of Agriculture – U.S. Forest Service (USFS)
  • Environmental Protection Agency
  • General Services Administration
  • Department of Labor – US Mine Safety and Health Administration

Due to long-term Federal Center development issues, around 10 other agencies are located just around the Denver Federal Center or next door in Golden

Denver Federal Center Perimeter & Lakewood
  • Department of the Interior (DOI) 
    • National Parks Services (NPS) – Denver Service Center, NPS Planning, Design and Construction Management Office, Technical Information Center
    • Fish & Wildlife Service (FWS) – Multiple System Engineering and Management Programs
    • Office of Inspector General (OIG)
  • Department of Energy
    • Western Area Power Admnistration (WAPA)
  • Bureau of Land Management (BLM) State Office

Golden

  • Department of Energy
    • Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Golden Field Office
    • National Renewable Energy Laboratory (DOE) – National Lab for Solar, Wind, Biomass, Hydrogen, Geothermal, water power research, Technology Transfer, and Commercialization
  • Department of the Interior
    • U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)

Boulder

  • Department of Commerce
    • National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)
      • Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR)
      • The Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) – NOAA Environmental Software Infrastructrure and Interoperability Group (NESII); NOAA’s Renewable Energy Program; and the Unmanned Aircraft Systems program (UAS).
      • National Weather Service (NWS)
      • Denver-Boulder Weather Forecast Office 
      • Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC) 
      • National Environmental Satellite Data and Information Service (NESDIS)
      • National Geophysical Data Center 
      • National Climatic Data Center – Paleoclimatology Branch

National Aeronautics and Space Administration

 Fort Collins

  • Department of the Interior 
    • U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) – Science Center, John Wesley Powell Research Center

    U.S. Department of Agriculture

    • Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) – Information Technology Center
    • Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service – Animal Care, Biotechnology Regulatory Services, International Services, Plant Protection & Quarantine, Center for Plant Health Science and Technology Lab, Veterinary Services, Wildlife Services, Wildlife Damage Management, National Wildlife Research Program (NWRC)
    • Agricultural Research Service – Natural Resources Research Center, Crops Research Lab, National Center for Genetic Resources Preservation

Other Civilian Government Agencies

    • Denver Federal Center Perimeter & Lakewood
      • Department of Veteran Affairs
      • Department of Transportation
    • Denver
      • Federal Bureau of Investigation

      • Small Business Administration
      • Department of Treasury – Denver Mint

Military Government Agencies

There are six Military Air Force Bases including Buckley AFB in Aurora and Fort Carson AFB in Colorado Springs. Tenants include: Northern Command, Homeland Defense, FEMA, NORAD, US Army, Air National Guard, and National Guard as well as Intelligence functions.